ASAHI SUPER DRY

asashi-super-dry

It was in 1987 that Asahi Super Dry arrived on the scene as Japan’s first ever dry beer. Since then, its unique flavour has earned its place as a standard that continues to elevate the flavour and satisfaction of beer even to this day. In this article, we take a look at what made Asahi Super Dry win the hearts of young and old alike over the years, and a recipe for a type of otsumami – the star of the izakaya dining experience – and their match made in heaven that is Asahi Super Dry.

Photography: Naoto Ijichi

THE ASAHI SUPER DRY STORY

The date was 17 March, 1987. This was the day that Japan’s first ever dry beer, Asahi Super Dry, made its way into the world. The journey that led to its creation was one filled with firsts, each new day bringing its own new challenge.

It all began with the search to make the perfect beer. From a survey of 5,000 respondents, the answer was clear – it had to be clearer and more refreshing, each glass make you wish you had just one more, and a great match for any dish. The survey uncovered
a distinct shift in preferences from a heavier, more bitter taste to a smoother, clearer and more refreshing one. Taking onboard this paradigm shift in customer needs, thus was born the new flavour concept of a dry draught beer.

The flavour of beer is determined almost entirely by the combination of yeast, base ingredients, and brewing process used. And it was here that
the challenge to develop a recipe for a dry draught beer began, by searching through the endless possibilities of the type of yeast to use, the type and amount of base ingredients, and the method used to prepare and brew the beer.

First came the search for the right yeast. Beer is created by taking the sugars from a wort made from malt, and using yeast to convert those sugars into alcohol and carbon dioxide. Limiting the amount of residual sugars left in the end product is essential to achieving a clean taste. Of the several hundred yeast strains that Asahi uses, yeast strain No. 318 excelled in its fermentation capabilities. Its ability to completely consume sugars made it possible to achieve just the right clear, undiluted taste while also adding its own unique aroma.

Next came the base ingredients and the production methods. What would be the optimal conditions to allow Asahi yeast strain No. 318 to perform at its best? The search for the right flavour led to a myriad of combinations being tested, with small adjustments being made with each one and a number of test samples being created. Keywords that defined the essence of a dry beer more clearly flowed – each glass makes you wish you had just one more, a good match for sashimi, and that doesn’t overpower food… More tests followed, pairing the samples with sashimi and a variety of other Japanese, Chinese, and western dishes and otsumami. After this lengthy process, at long last the perfect flavour was discovered, and so the original recipe of Asahi Super Dry came to be. It was this painstaking attention to detail that gave this beer the refined, clear taste that makes it a match for food of all varieties and makes every sip feel like the very first.

INTRODUCING IZAKAYA AND OTSUMAMI

The word izakaya refers to a Japanese style of restaurant that provides a menu of alcohol and simple, matching dishes. Said to have grown in popularity during the Edo period, the izakaya of the day were merchants who sold alcohol in bulk, then steadily began to allow patrons to drink their wares on the spot, and ended up serving simple food to match. The word ‘izakaya’ itself comes from a combination of the Japanese characters meaning ‘to stay and drink’ abbreviated into the sounds ‘izaka’, which was used to differentiate them from merchants who only
sold alcohol. The much higher proportion of men in the Edo period compared to women, and thus the large number of single men living alone, also provided a catalyst to the rise of the izakaya, who offered a way to easily enjoy both food and drink at the same place.

Of course, no talk of izakaya would be complete without discussing otsumami and the role they play in complementing drink. The word otsumami comes from the word for ‘snack’, and refers to food that can be easily picked up and eaten by hand. Common varieties include seafood and meat dishes, and even cheese and crackers depending on your drink of choice. All dishes are generally heavily
seasoned to help bring out the flavour in the drinks they accompany.

“Otsumami are à la carte dishes that are designed to complement your drink; not take centre stage.” So says Shota Sato, head chef of Osaka Trading co. in Tramsheds Harold Park, who earned the distinction of receiving one hat during his days as the head chef of Bar H Dining. See the opposite page for an original otsumami recipe from head chef Sato that can be easily made at home and acts as a great partner to Asahi Super Dry

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TEMPURA CORN AND SCALLOPS WITH SOY BUTTER

tempura

The sweetness of seasonal corn mixed with some salt and soy sauce come together in a mouthwatering balance. Add in the aroma and a hint of heat with shichimi spices, and you have a dish that makes the perfect partner for drinking beer. Try it with just some salt or mixed in with some soy sauce.

INGREDIENTS (SERVES 2)

Corn 100g
Scallops 1 pack
Shichimi spice 1 pinch
Frying oil As needed
Corn flour 1 pinch

TEMPURA DIPPING SAUCE (as needed)

Plain flour 1 cup
Corn flour 2 tbsp
Cold water 150ml
Vinegar 35ml

SOY BUTTER

Butter 10g
Salt Salt
Soy sauce To taste

INSTRUCTIONS

1. Remove the corn from the cob, and dice the scallops into a size roughly twice that of the pieces of corn.

2. Mix the plain flour and corn flour (A). Separately, mix the cold water and vinegar (B). Combine (B) into (A), lightly mixing so that a slight floury consistency remains.

3. Fill a frying pan halfway with the frying oil and heat to 180 degrees. After mixing 1. and the pinch of corn flour in a bowl, add 2 tbsp of the tempura dipping sauce and swiftly combine.

4. Scoop the mix using a large spoon and place slowly into the oil, deep frying both sides for approximately
15 seconds.

5. Sprinkle shichimi spices over the tempura and dress with a sauce made by combining the butter, salt, and soy sauce.

WHAT TO LOOK FOR

Keep all ingredients cold before you cook to prevent them from collapsing!
Don’t deep fry the corn for too long or it will burst!

shota-sato

CHEF: SHOTA SATO

Profile

Specialises in a modern Japanese style that blends both Japanese and western influences. Fifteen years experience as a chef. Worked as a chef specialising in French cuisine at hotel-based restaurants in Hokkaido, Okinawa, Tokyo, and Chiba in Japan. Came to Australia in 2009, and after gaining further experience at multiple restaurants, earned the distinction of receiving one hat in 2015 working as the head chef at Bar H Dining, a title only awarded to restaurants selected by the Sydney Morning Herald’s Good Food Guide. Involved in the launch of the Osaka Trading co. in September of 2016 where he now works as the head chef.